Gardening Benefit for Cabochon and Rock Tumbling Rockhounds

We have been tumbling North Georgia river stones, and most recently the Summerville Agate, in a 20lb barrel from MJR Tumblers. Each stage of tumbling takes about a week, and at the conclusion of each tumbling stage, I have been dumping the grit and the agate and river stone grit into the flower garden. The flowers LOVE IT! The rose bushes are more plentiful than ever before, and deeper colors than they were last year. One small rose bush that was red last year, was almost tie-dyed looking with streaks of white. The red impatiens are now a shade of orange. The mint and parsley plants are overgrowing! While this is not fertilizer, I can only guess the plants appreciate this concentrated mineral content in the otherwise mostly red clay soil. After I do dump the tumbling grit sludge into the garden I dilute it, and that happens naturally because I need to clean the tumbling barrel before the next stage, and also need to rinse thoroughly the stones before starting the next tumbling phase, or polishing phase, so I am hosing down the barrel and stones over the garden too, and that helps dilute the sludge and make it run over more of the garden to be soaked up.
I am sure that the sludge mix from a cabochon workstation would have the similar effect on your outdoors flowering plants. Never dispense of tumbling or cabochon grit down a drain, and no never, dispense of that valuable mineral sludge, but add it to your garden. For any questions about gardening, or rock tumbling, feel free to contact Charles at charles@americangeode.com.


Hope this is helpful!

Field Trip to Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location

May 8 2021 Field Trip to Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location                         

By Charles Snider

I had been looking forward to this fossil trip sponsored by the Georgia Mineral Society for the chance to find tetrapod tracks. I was familiar with ferns, branches, and other vegetation because I had gone to Carbondale and Centralia, Pennsylvania sites of old strip mines, and collecting through the shale and slate, had found many fine ferns and fronds. This was the first chance to find real critters! Of course, I knew that if I made a breakthrough discovery that it would need to be shared with the Alabama club, and respective university and state agencies, but I would be happy with that for a breakthrough discovery.

I arrived the night before and stayed in Birmingham. All I needed was a place to sleep and shower, so I found a cheap hotel near downtown. How cheap was it? Let me put it this way, the night attendant was behind bullet-proof glass. I made it in great time however, somehow avoided the regular and horrific traffic around Atlanta, so I had time to step out in Birmingham that evening. I had my first post-covid margarita at a fine place that followed COVID protocol and then a night-cap at an establishment called Collins Bar. I recommend Collins Bar because their main decora is a huge mural of the entire wall behind the bar of the Periodic Table of Elements. So, while you are sipping a drink, you are quizzing yourself, or others on the Periodic Table!

The next morning, I met the field trip leaders at the nearby Walmart for sign-in. I have said this before, I wonder if Walmart appreciates that they are the universal meeting site of most gem, mineral, and fossil society field trips? If they did, they should offer early Saturday morning sales on gloves, chisels, hammers, and prybars.

We carpooled to the fossil site, formerly known as the Union Chapel Mine, and now also called the Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site. The area is large and full of slate and shale, to turn over, crack, split in half, and examine closely. The site sat on an ancient marsh, so is full of Pennsylvanian Age plant fossils, ferns, fauna, and tetrapod tracks and other vertebrates. The abundance of fossils, and the abundance of variety make this former coal mining site one of the most significant fossil sites in the world. In the 1990s, the grandson of the owners of the coal mine brought some examples from the mine to their high school science teacher, who recognized that these were something special. The teacher was able to visit the student’s family’s mine, and recognized the significance of the tetrapod tracks, and abundance of flora, fauna, invertebrate, and other fossils, and shared the information with the local paleontology club, word spread to professional paleontologists, the university, and the state. Now through a collective partnership of private and public, state and academic, the site is preserved and protected for fossil digs by academics, researchers, and fossil clubs.

The labor is not intensive unless you want to crack and pry apart larger shale and slate pieces. There is a lot of material on the surface for collecting and examining. There are cliff walls to one side, but that area is off limits. Past visits had yielded tracks, and we were told of someone’s discovery of the tracks of a giant scorpion. During the dig, I had the good fortune of seeing others’ finds that included burrows of insects, many broken branches, twigs, and other tree parts, and potential tracks. My personal finds included an almost 12 inch branch in a large plate, some plates with broken bark, twigs, and branches, and some interesting plates that had gas bubbles that I learned later were marsh bubbles – not the most exciting find, but fascinating to think that marsh bubbles were preserved in situ like that. At the follow-up Zoom show-and-tell, some fellow members had found tracks, where you could see the claws, and the back and forth motion of the crawling creature.

For future visits, be sure to take plenty of snacks and water. While the area is adjacent to where you park, the nearby gas station, or Walmart are far enough from the remote location that your limited time and access to this special place would be compromised if you were leaving for snacks or drinks. There is no shade, so be prepared with sunscreen.

I did engage in a conversation with members who noted that if some of the surface stone were moved with a bulldozer, and just 5 feet lower were exposed, that there would likely be new, and potentially breakthrough discoveries to be made. This was an excellent trip however, well organized and coordinated, and I am hopeful to return. For other fossil stories, and especially geode hunting and geode cracking articles, please find other articles at http://www.americangeode.com .

Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location
Union Chapel Mine/Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site Fossil Location

2021 Columbia, SC Gem, Mineral, and Jewelry Show!

The Columbia, SC Gem & Mineral Society will hold its   2021

53rd Annual Gem, Mineral, & Jewelry Show                 

Fri Nov. 19, 10:00 – 6:00;

Sat. Nov. 20, 10:00 – 6:00;

Sun. Nov. 21, 12:00 – 5:00

Jamil Temple

206 Jamil Rd.      

Columbia, SC 29210

Club member’s rock collections on exhibit & lapidary demonstrations.

South Carolina amethyst on display.

Sponsored by The Columbia Gem & Mineral Society

Jewelry, beads, loose stones, fossils, minerals, gold, silver, & tools for sale

Geodes sold & cut

Sponsored by The Columbia Gem & Mineral Society

$5.00 for adults, Sixteen & under free.

 All military & their dependents free.

803-736-9317   Sue

803-356-1472   Sharon, dealers

ashrader@mindspring.com     

http://www.cgms.rocks
https://www.facebook.com/Columbia-Gem-and-Mineral-Society-Inc.

If you would like more info on local Mineral shows and rockhound clubs click on the American Geode News page for up to date listings and links to Gem Show, Mineral Show, and Fossil Show announcements. American Geode updates our rockhound news twice an hour and showcase the top mineral shows and rockhound news in the USA and the World. Also, follow American Geode on Twitter for even more rockhound events, commentary, and laughable quips from American Geode. https://twitter.com/AmericanGeode
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2021 Grassy Creek Mineral and Gem Show!


Grassy Creek Mineral and Gem Show!

The 37th Annual Grassy Creek Mineral and Gem Show is put on by the Parkway Fire and Rescue to raise money for new equipment and new buildings.

This Gem Show has everything! Over 60 US and International dealers with almost any kind of jewelry, gemstone and mineral specimens, fossil, lapidary equipment and more you might want. Each booth is 20 by 40 foot so there are LOTS of items for sale.

Parking and admission are free.

Food is available.

Portajohns are available. Hopefully by the time of the gem show, the new restrooms and shower facilities will be built.

This is an outside event so be prepared for rain.

Gem Show Dates: Sunday, July 25th to Sunday, August 1st, 2021 with some vendors open on Saturday 24th.

Gem Show Hours: 9 to 6 daily with many vendors open earlier and later because they are staying with their booth.

Gem Show Address: 136 Majestic View, Spruce Pine, NC 28777 at the new Parkway Fire and Rescue event grounds. This location is on the hill above the previous location.

Contact: Donna Collis:  collisdonna@yahoo.com 828-765-5519 or Parkway Fire and Rescue at 828-765-2117.

Email: info@grassycreekgemshow.org 
Website: www.grassycreekgemshow.org. Applications and pictures are available on the website.
Grassy Creek Mineral & Gem Show
136 Majestic View, Spruce Pine
PO Box 188 Spruce Pine, NC 28777
Phone: (828) 765-2117, Email: info@grassycreekgemshow.org

The gem show is organized by Donna Collis, who has been involved with the event for over 20 years, and Roger Frye, who has helped plan the show for more than two decades.

Started by the Grassy Creek Fire Department, for the first two years, the gem show took place where KFC and Taco Bell are now located. When Grassy Creek Fire Department merged with Altapass Fire Department to create Parkway Fire and Rescue, show organizers chose to keep the name. The show was later moved to the field across from Parkway Fire and Rescue for three years before moving to its former location at Parkway Fire and Rescue in 1990, where it remained until 2015.

The department purchased the field on Majestic View from Wade Hughes in January 2016 with the intent of making it the home of the new Parkway Fire and Rescue.

Parking and admission to the gem show are free and money raised goes toward new equipment for Parkway Fire and Rescue.

If you would like more info on local Mineral shows and rockhound clubs click on the American Geode News page for up to date listings and links to Gem Show, Mineral Show, and Fossil Show announcements. American Geode updates our rockhound news twice an hour and showcase the top mineral shows and rockhound news in the USA and the World. Also, follow American Geode on Twitter for even more rockhound events, commentary, and laughable quips from American Geode. https://twitter.com/AmericanGeode
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Knoxville Gem and Mineral Society rock sale May 29-30, 2021

Knoxville Gem and Mineral Society will be holding a rock sale Saturday May 29, 2021 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM and Sunday Sunday May 30, 2021 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The sale will be at the KGMS clubhouse 2931 Fawver Lane, Knoxville 37914. Please bring checks or cash.


There are over 80 varieties of rough available including Angel Wing, Black Onyx, Bloody Basin Agate, Brenda Agate, Brazilian Agate, Carnelian, Golden Moss Agate, Graveyard Point Agate, Kentucky Agate, multiple varieties of Obsidian, Ohio Flint, Oregon Picture Jasper, Petrified Wood, Red Agate and Jasper, Serpentine, Tennessee Paint Rock, Tiger’s Eye, Rhyolite, Unakite, and Wonderstone.

For more information visit
Knoxville Gem and Mineral Society on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/events/315143346677089/

If you would like more info on local Mineral shows and rockhound clubs click on the American Geode News page for up to date listings and links to Gem Show, Mineral Show, and Fossil Show announcements. American Geode updates our rockhound news twice an hour and showcase the top mineral shows and rockhound news in the USA and the World. Also, follow American Geode on Twitter for even more rockhound events, commentary, and laughable quips from American Geode. https://twitter.com/AmericanGeode
https://www.ebay.com/usr/americangeode